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Adrienne, Ursula and Zoe, Wild Bore

What do you expect of a show with pin up artwork that splays half-clad women baring buttocks on stage? Your perception of fleshy, holey, cracky, getting to the bottom of it and talking out of your ass will never be the same again in this adults-only performance on the potentials of misinterpretation.

Pitch together two comedians and a provocateur, and what you get is bold. Now break it down to essentials. The first comedian is Zoë Coombs Marr, renowned for mind-bending gags, gross outs and the absurd. The second is Adrienne Truscott, audacious, sarcastic and original when it comes to rape jokes and asking-for-it funnies. Now toss in writer and performer Ursula Martinez, at ease with undoing all the rules, at castle with nudity. What you get is fiery. A parody of mega-insanity where lines are sometimes forgotten.

Wild Bore is a political satire against critics. It reconnoitres the misperception that ascends when people make dim or luminous efforts to locate or dislocate the intention of creative art—be it script, artefact or performance. In a fun and highly disordered routine, the cast treats the audience to a jig with words and something unnameable that sprints completely off the charts.

You laugh to tears, and it is of no consequence that your mirth is mad as King George’s or uneasy as a baffled thief’s. Maybe some elements you like, maybe some not so much—they feel like stolen moments you’re unclear you should witness. As you come face to face with a pro-feminism act on the power of nudity on stage, it makes you wonder, really wonder, what radicalism is all about.

Whatever you draw from this furious hilarity, one thing is certain—it is a performance this year that will linger in your mind.

Not suitable for prudes.

Running 17 May to 4 June at Malthouse Theatre.

Eugen M. Bacon studied at Maritime Campus, less than two minutes walk from The Royal Observatory of the Greenwich Meridian. A computer graduate mentally re-engineered into creative writing, Eugen has a PhD in writing. She has published over 100 short stories and creative articles, and has in work a creative non-fiction book and a literary speculative novel. Her short stories are published in journals, magazines & anthologies worldwide. Eugen is editor of MELBOURNE Magazine and sub-editor of FICTION Magazine at The Australia Times.

Profile: View Eugen's profile here

Email: eugen.bacon@theaustraliatimes.com.au